Today

Every individual living with diabetes needs unique care.

We at Cell MedX encourage people with diabetes and their families to learn as much as possible about the latest medical therapies and approaches, as well as healthy lifestyle choices. Good communication with a team of experts can help you feel in control and respond to changing needs.

Your Health Care Team is Very Important

You

  • You are the most important member of your health care team.
  • You are the one who is affected by diabetes and cares for it every day. Only you know how you feel and what you’re willing and able to do.
  • You do the exercise.
  • You make and eat the foods on your meal plan.
  • You take the medicine or inject the insulin.
  • You check your blood sugar (glucose) levels and keep track of the results
  • You are the first to notice any problems.
  • Your health care team depends on you to talk to them honestly and to tell them how you feel.

Treatment and Care

A Diabetic Specialist

A doctor with special training (and usually certification) in diseases such as diabetes is called an endocrinologist. If you do not see an endocrinologist, look for a primary doctor, family practice doctor or an internist who has cared for many people with diabetes. Your primary care doctor may also be the one who refers you to specialists or other team members. Other health care providers who provide primary care include nurse practitioners and physician assistants, who typically work in collaboration with a physician.

Checking Your Blood Glucose

Blood glucose (blood sugar) monitoring is the main tool you have to check your diabetes control. This check tells you your blood glucose level at any one time. Keeping a log of your results is vital. When you bring this record to your health care provider, you have a good picture of your body’s response to your diabetes care plan to help keep track of your levels.

What Are the Target Ranges?

The American Diabetes Association suggests the following targets for most non-pregnant adults with diabetes. More or less stringent glycemic goals may be appropriate for each individual. (Source American Diabetes Association).

  • A1C: 7%
  • A1C may also be reported as eAG: 154 mg/dl
  • Before a meal (preprandial plasma glucose): 70–130 mg/dl
  • 1-2 hours after beginning of the meal (Postprandial plasma glucose): Less than 180 mg/d

Medication

People with type 1 diabetes must use insulin. Some people with type 2 diabetes can manage their diabetes with healthy eating and exercise. However, your doctor may need to also prescribe oral medications (pills) and/or insulin to help you meet your target blood glucose levels. The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood glucose (sugar) control is often meal planning, weight loss, and exercising. Sometimes these measures are not enough to bring blood glucose levels down near the normal range. The next step is taking a medicine that lowers blood glucose levels.

Oral combination therapy

Because drugs listed act in different ways to lower blood glucose levels, they may be used together. For example, a biguanide and a sulfonylurea may be used together. Many combinations can be used. Though taking more than one drug can be more costly and can increase the risk of side effects, combining oral medications can improve blood glucose control when taking only a single pill does not have the desired effects. Switching from one single pill to another is not as effective as adding another type of diabetes medicine.

(Source: American Diabetic Association)